Methods for Motivating Employees for Employee Satisfaction

1.Rewards: People behave in ways that they believe are in their best interest, they constantly look for payoffs for their efforts. They expect good job performance to lead to organizational goal attainment, which in turn leads to satisfying their individual goals or needs. Organization, then, use rewards to motivate people.

2. Challenging Jobs: Job design refers to the number and nature of activities in a job. The key issue is whether jobs should be more specialized or more enriched and non-routine. Job design has been implemented in several ways. Job enlargement assigns workers to additional same-level tasks to increase the number of tasks they have to perform. Job rotation systematically moves workers from job to job. Job enrichment means building motivators like opportunities for achievement into the job by making it more interesting and challenging. Forming natural work groups, combining tasks, establishing client relationships, vertically loading the job, and having open feedback channels may implement Job enrichment.

3. Using Merit Pay: A merit raise is a salary increase, usually permanent, that is based on the employee’s individual performance. It is a continuing increment rather than a single payment like a bonus. Relying heavily on merit rewards can be a problem because the reinforcement benefits of merit pay is usually only determined once per year.

4. Using Spot Awards: A spot award is one given to an employee as soon as the laudable performance is observed. These awards are consistent with principles of motivation because they are contingent on good performance and are awarded immediately.

5. Using Skill-Based Pay: With skill-based pay, employees are paid for the range, depth, and types of skills and knowledge they are capable of using rather than for the job they currently hold. Skill based pay is consistent with motivation theory because people have a self-concept in which they seek to fulfill their potential. The system also appeals to the employee’s sense of self-efficacy because the reward is a formal and concrete recognition that the person can do the more challenging job well.

6. Using Recognition: Some employees highly value day-to-day recognition from their supervisors, peers and team members because it is important for their work to be appreciated by others. Recognition helps satisfy the need people have to achieve and be recognized for their achievement.

“Recognition is like a small drop of oil in the machinery of business. It just makes things run a little smoother.” -– Obert Tanner

7. Using Job Redesign: Job design refers to the number and nature of activities in a job. The key issue is whether jobs should be more specialized or more enriched and no routine. Job design has been implemented in several ways. Job enlargement assigns workers to additional same-level tasks to increase the number of tasks they have to perform. Job rotation systematically moves workers from job to job. Job enrichment means building motivators like opportunities for achievement into the job by making it more interesting and challenging. Job enrichment may be implemented by forming natural work groups, combining tasks, establishing client relationships, vertically loading the job, and having open feedback channels.

8. Using Empowerment: Empowerment means giving employees the authority, tools, and information they need to do their jobs with greater autonomy, as well as the self-confidence to perform new jobs effectively. Empowerment boosts employees’ feelings of self-efficacy and enables them to use their potential more fully.

9. Using Goal-Setting Methods: People are strongly motivated to achieve goals they consciously set. Setting goals with employees can be a very effective way of motivating them. Goals should be clear and specific, measurable and verifiable, challenging but realistic, and set with participation.

10. Using Positive Reinforcement: Positive reinforcement programs rely on operant conditioning principles to supply positive reinforcement and change behavior. Experts claim it is better to focus on improving desirable behaviors rather than on decreasing undesirable ones. There are a variety of consequences including social consequences (e.g., peer approval or praise from the boss), intrinsic consequences (e.g., the enjoyment the person gets from accomplishing challenging tasks), or tangible consequences (e.g., bonuses or merit raises).

11. Using Lifelong Learning: Lifelong learning can be used to deal with problems of downsizing and employee commitment, and to counterbalance their negative effects. It provides extensive continuing training and education, from basic remedial skills to advanced decision-making techniques, throughout the employees’ careers, which provide employees the opportunity to boost their self-efficacy and self- actualization.

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